Dr Mark Doffman

Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

MA (Sheffield), PhD (Open)

Research

Psychology of performance, time and timing in contemporary performance, jazz studies, creativity studies, improvisation, and musical entrainment.

PROFILE

Dr Mark Doffman is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow in the Faculty of Music. His current 3 year  project looks at the practice of timing in music across a range of genres. Prior to his Leverhulme award, Mark was a Research Fellow on the AHRC funded project ‘Creative Practice in Contemporary Concert Music’,  a study led by Professor Eric Clarke. This three year project examined the nature of  collaborative work between contemporary composers and performers.

Before coming to Oxford, Mark was a full time researcher in the Sociology Department at the Open University investigating the working lives of black British jazz musicians. Mark continues to perform as a jazz drummer; his performance schedule includes weekly  work at The Spin Jazz Club in Oxford.

PUBLICATIONS

Doffman, Mark (2013) ‘The Tomorrow’s Warriors jam sessions: repertoires of transmission and hospitality’.Black Music Research Journal 33 (1), 71-90.

Clarke, E., Doffman, M., and Lim, L. (2013) ‘Distributed creativity and ecological dynamics: a case study of Liza Lim’s Tongue of the Invisible’. Music and Letters (due Autumn 2013).

Clarke, Eric & Doffman, Mark (2013) ‘Expressive performance in contemporary concert music’ in Dorottya Fabian, Emory Schubert and Renee Timmers (Eds.) Expressiveness in Musical Performance. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (due Autumn 2013).

Doffman, Mark (2013) ‘Groove: temporality, awareness and the feeling of entrainment in jazz performance’ in Martin Clayton, Byron Dueck and Laura Leante (Eds.)Experience and Meaning in Music Performance. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (due Autumn  2013).

Doffman, Mark (2011) ‘Jammin’ an ending: creativity, knowledge and conduct amongst jazz musicians’twentieth century music, 8 (2), 203-225.

Doffman, Mark (2009) ‘Making it groove! Entrainment, participation and discrepancy in the ‘conversation’ of a jazz trio’, Language and History 52 (1), 130-147.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

Dr Mark Doffman

Faculty of Music
St Aldates
Oxford OX1 1DB

Telephone: 01865 276145
mobile 07711 671647

Email: mark.doffman@music.ox.ac.uk